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Finding Dumb Investors is a Dumb Idea

By: Tim Berry

 

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Are you looking for dumb investors?

“How can I find investors who don’t take much equity?”

“How can I find investors who don’t interfere with my running the business?

I first posted my objections to this kind of thinking nine years ago in Dumb Investors Dumb Idea, one of the earliest posts on this blog. That was before I joined an angel investment group and became one of those investors. My objections then are a lot stronger now. And I still see a stream of this kind of thinking in blogs and at my favorite question and answer site, Quora.com.

Valuation determines equity

The equity share from investment is simple math. If your investors put in $100,000, that’s 10% of a startup valued at $1 million, and 50% of a startup valued at $200,000. So what’s the underlying valuation? Read up on that with 5 things entrepreneurs need to know about valuation and understand startup valuation. So with normal angel investment, the startup founders want a higher valuation and the angel investors want lower. It’s a lot like negotiating to buy a house or a used car. Ultimately, both sides have to agree, or there is no deal.

Angel investors normally care and add value

Angel investors are overwhelmingly amateur investors, investing their own money, investing in industries they know or local startups. They are successful entrepreneurs giving back. They believe in their ability to select startups well, study them well (it’s called due diligence) before deciding on a deal, and to offer valuable advice and experience. I’ve seen dozens of pitches that ended with investors not interested in startups whose founders knew everything and wanted no advice. People who don’t want interference with their business are not going to do well with angel investors.

Normal angels choose angel investment instead of leaving their money with an investment advisor, bank, or some other institution. They know that investing in startups is risky, but they trust themselves and expect to be able to help.

Published: December 14, 2016
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Source: Tim Berry

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Tim Berry

Tim Berry is co-founder of Have Presence, founder and Chairman of Palo Alto Software, founder of bplans.com, and a co-founder of Borland International. He is author of books and software including LivePlan and Business Plan Pro, The Plan-As-You-Go Business Plan, and Lean Business Planning, published by Motivational Press in 2015. He has a Stanford MBA degree and degrees with honors from the University of Oregon and the University of Notre Dame. He taught starting a business at the University of Oregon for 11 years.

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